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Math Journal Sundays

It's a rainy day this morning ... rainy and chilly.  I guess it's nature's way of telling me to stay inside and clean my house today.  So ... let the procrastination begin ...

I've got some GREAT foldables to share with you today.  This week I had a reader ask me how I use my math journals in my classroom.  I guess my math journals are more of an interactive glossary or how-to manual.  Every time we have a new definition, or a formula or procedure, I try to do a foldable for it.  Students keep their foldables in their math journals, which is organized with a table of contents and page numbers at the top of each page.  I've been really excited to see my students use their journals as a tool during independent work or problem-solving activities.  I'm starting to see them go to their journals first for help, rather than lining up at my desk.  YAY!

photo of Prime and Composite Numbers, Factors and Multiples math journal entry @ Runde's Room

So, we're diving into the world of prime and composite numbers, and factors and multiples.  LOVE this quick unit.  I have a few really fun hands-on lessons from my newest math resource (see my last post here) that I'm excited to try.

On Monday we made two four-folds to define and give examples of prime and composite numbers and factors and multiples.

photo of Prime and Composite Numbers, Factors and Multiples math journal entry @ Runde's Room
















photo of greatest common factor math journal entry @ Runde's Roomphoto of greatest common factor math journal entry @ Runde's Room

On Tuesday we made a Venn diagram to show common factors and the greatest common factor.  We also defined these terms under the foldable.































photo of Prime Factorization Factor Tree math journal entry @ Runde's Roomphoto of Prime Factorization Factor Tree math journal entry @ Runde's Room
And on Wednesday we started on prime factors.  So of course, we had to make a foldable factor "tree".

Thursday we had our big three-part lesson on prime factors, and so many students went back to their math journals to see the factor tree.


























I've been thinking I want to start math centers or stations in the classroom - something on a far more organized and larger scale than I've done before.  Okay - I've been more than thinking, I went out and started to buy a few things.  I got some large sterilite containers, some flashcards, some sticker paper for cute labels, and a few more things.  Getting it finished is my project for this week - hopefully I can get it finished by Wednesday so the students can have a center day on Thursday.  I can't wait to share it with you when I'm done.  I've been reading and researching a lot, and pinning ideas I've seen, but I'd love to hear if and how you do math centers in your classroom.  If you use math centers with your older students, please leave a comment with some advice for me.

photo of Factors and Multiples cootie catchers @ Runde's Room
And ... of course ... one of my math centers wouldn't be complete if they didn't have a pack of my cootie catchers (my students LOVE these).  So, I made up a pack of Factors and Multiples Cootie Catchers.  Each pack has 12 different cootie catchers - 2 of each for:  prime and composite numbers, factors, G.C.F, prime factorization, multiples, and L.C.M.  The pack also contains a BONUS Factors and Multiples worksheet to use as independent practice or a quiz.  Click on the picture to the right to preview it.  And as always ... if you are one of the first three people to leave me a comment with your email address, I'll send you a copy.

Happy Sunday!!!

35 comments:

  1. I would love one of your cootie catchers. Thank you tccam71@comcast.net. Tamara

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    1. Thanks, Tamara. I'll send them out shortly.

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  2. I'm loving the tree!!!! What an amazing resource your kids have to take with them to middle school!

    ❤ Mor Zrihen from...
    A Teacher's Treasure
    Teaching Treasures Shop

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    1. Thanks, Mor! I'll send them out shortly.

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  3. I love everything you do!! Happy to (I think) be one of the first! Kathleenbing@gmail.com
    ☼Kate
    To The Square Inch

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    1. Thanks, Kate! I'll send them out shortly.

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  4. Okay folks - that's three for my cootie cathcers. But I'd still LOVE to hear more about math centers in your classroom!!!

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  5. I am totally obsessed with your foldables! There are so many great ways to use these and I LOVE seeing your examples! I could have totally used your tree factor when I taught 5-6 grades too! Thank you for posting these:) LOVE them!

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    1. Thank-you so much, Annie! I think I'm becoming obsessed with them, too. I spend all week thinking about what new ones we can make, then all day Sunday fixing up pictures and blogging about them. I may start dreaming about them soon. ;)

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  6. How awesome! I think the idea of cootie catchers in math is genius- I had only thought of them in literacy :)

    I think my life's place is the comment after the freebie, lol, but that's ok, I just wanted you to know that I think these are a fantastic idea! And thanks for all of the examples of foldables! I am pretty new to that idea, but your pics help get me inspired to try them more in my own class :)

    ~Stephanie
    3rd Grade Thoughts

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    1. Thank-you so much, Stephanie! I used the cootie catchers first for literacy, but the students liked them so much I had to make some up for math, too. I'm new to the foldables, too - this is my first year using them ... but I definitely recommend them!

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  7. I use these in my and science! (When I called them cootie catchers my kids just gave me a puzzling look so I call them information catchers). Also, there is a company that makes resource books called "Cootie Catchers". Yours are adorable!

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    1. Thank-you! I actually got the idea from my daughter last year (when she was in grade 2). She came home with some of the fun ones she made with her friends at school, and then I remembered how I used to like them, so I thought there had to be a fun way to integrate them into my classroom.

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  8. The tree foldable is adorable! What a great way to get the kids motivated!! I also like the Venn Diagram. Lifting up the flaps is genius :)

    ~Stephanie
    Teaching in Room 6

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    1. Thank-you so much, Stephanie! I had a lot of fun with these this week ... I'll probably spend the rest of today thinking about new ones for next week ... multiples and review ... definitely something Easter-themed.

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  9. Please, Please, Please! I know you are wayyyyyy past three but here is my email address just in case :)
    born2bateacher@comcast.net
    Thanks
    Denice

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  10. This comment has been removed by the author.

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  11. I love the tree foldable. I do math stations in my room. I use the Acronym "M.A.T.H". I got this idea from Clutter-Free Classroom. You can go to my blog and see how I make it work, if you are interested.

    Good luck! I know YOU will be able to make it work. You make everything seem so easy :)

    Elizabeth
    Fun in Room 4B

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  12. These are fantastic! I'm going to pin this so I remember for next year!

    The Science Penguin

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  13. Hello Mrs. Runde,
    I came by your blog and room in referrence to your Sunday Journals, I wanted to share I have since started helping my son with his. His main source of teachers are Virtual on the computer,or to talk to them through the computer microphone or text on the IM during class time, and K-mail(like a email), I have given them your blog addy,I wanted to share this with you, I found on You tube some other info you may like, It is listed under Interactive Math Journals. My son was having some issues with Area and parimeter with parts that are flipped and or missing and when there are no numbers so I am on a hunt for getting info.

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    1. Thank-you so much! I'm so glad you're finding some ideas that are useful for you and your son. Thanks for the info on the youtube videos, I'll have to check that out!

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  14. Thank you for your awesome Math Journal Sundays blog posts. They have inspired me to rethink my math journals (and reading). I knew about foldables, but getting to see so many ideas in action inspired me to spice it up in the classroom. I noted your inspiration in my blog post at http://lifeloveliteracy.blogspot.com/2012/04/big-thoughts-bookmark-freebie-foldable.html and wanted to let you know! I look forward to reading more of your great ideas!

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    1. Thank-you so much, Tamara! I'm so happy you're inspired by these posts!!!

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  15. Do you have the students make each part of their math foldables? I have four classes of 83 students and I think making 83 trees would take me forever!?

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    1. Hi, Ms. Hines!

      My students make all the parts for their foldables. I make one under the elmo so they can copy, but they are responsible for completely making their own.

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  16. I just came across your blog and love it! I am new to interactive notebooking but I quickly managed to make these examples. I am a visual learner so the pics are GREAT!!!

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  17. I am not sure what a cootie catcher is?
    Amkimble9@gmail.com

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  18. Hi, I CAN'T wait for your interactive math journal!!!!!!! I want to start the year using math journals....I haven't ever done it before! Let me know when you are ready to put it on TPT. :)
    npatton@tong464.org

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  19. I'm very glad I found this. I'm starting prime and composite numbers next Monday. It's great to have an idea to go back to school with. We are on October break this week.

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    1. I love your Math ideas and foldables. I am definitely going to be back to visit you blog often. Thanks for sharing your ideas. I am also excited to check out your TPT store. =)

      Janna
      Fabulous Finch Facts

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  20. I know I'm a little late....definitely not one of the first three to post, but would LOVE a copy of your cootie catcher!!!

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  21. Great ideas.
    After my students understand prime and composite numbers, we sing the prime song. It goes to the tune Are You Sleeping?

    2, 3, 5 Are you sleeping,
    2, 3, 5 Are you sleeping,
    7, 11 Father John?
    7, 11 Father John?
    13, 17, 19 Morning bells are ringing
    13, 17, 19 Morning bells are ringing.
    23, 23 Ding dong.

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  22. I'm obsessed with your math journal sunday posts. This is definitely something I have to implement in my classroom next year.

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  23. I am using your interactive math journal this year while teaching 6th grade for the 1st time (taught 5th before). And I am using your cootie catchers (and I think I have bought everything else you sell, honestly). Just wondering if you have any insight on how to add the new CCSS for being able to use the distributive property to rewrite addition problems when the addends have a common factor. For example 36+8 as 4(9+2). I want to work this in to a journal entry because it's key to 6th grade mastery of this standard but don't have any creative ideas. I've poured through your blog entries and haven't seen anything. Let me know if you have any insight. Thanks! You honestly make me a better teacher with all that you do.

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